Tag Archives: two-stage exams

Two-pagers on two-stagers

Two-stage collaborative exams are a winner: Students both like them and learn from them.  I’ve been collecting folk wisdom and implementation tips around two-stage exams, wondering what information exists to support instructors who may be unsure how to use them. Two-pagers: The Earth and Ocean Science – Science Education Initiative Times, February 2011. (Focuses on […]

Why two-stage exams? UBC-centric evidence

At the 2016 CTLT Summer Institute, I co-facilitated the session on Assessment and Evaluation. Using the opportunity to advertise two-stage exams, I provided evidence for three main points: Students learn from them Students participate meaningfully Students like them The research I used to back these is all home-grown at UBC (of course, this isn’t an exhaustive […]

Two-stage exams literature round-up

Two-stage exams are exams which students first write individually before getting into groups to complete the same (or similar) set of questions again. This harnesses students’ engagement in the high-stakes environment to create a learning opportunity through peer interactions and immediate feedback. Besides, it’s fun. Over the first couple months of the summer semester, @jossives and I have […]

Evidence-based teaching strategies in Physics 101

Physics 101 is the introductory calculus-based physics course for life science students at UBC. Over the past decade, departmental efforts related to the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative have resulted into the “transformation” of this course, from traditional lecture-based instruction to an interactive engagement style. Pre-reading assignments, peer instruction and clickers, in-class worksheets, and two-stage […]

Guest post: “Breaking Bad” – Encouraging Two-Stage Exams in Science Classrooms

(This is a guest post by Chad Atkins, PhD candidate in the Department of Chemistry at UBC. Find him on Twitter as @chemchad.) If asked how science is taught at a university level, a common response would likely start by describing details of the class: there would be a pale and grizzled professor with graying […]