(In this post, I collect presentation materials related to my project studying paired teaching.) In my department, we’ve been pairing faculty together to teach courses. The main goal is to provide these faculty opportunity to develop their teaching. My job is to figure out: Are they learning about teaching? The short answer is: Yes, they are. […]

Last term, instead of the UBC-standard iClickers, we used Learning Catalytics as our personal response system in the classroom. Joss Ives has detailed his workflow with the system, which involved three different devices (one to run the lecture slides, one to project the student view of Catalytics, and one to run the instructor side of […]

This semester is my first as an instructor. Although I have a lot of experience as a Teaching Assistant in university physics classrooms, and even some (brief and low-responsibility) experience lecturing in front of a large class, being in full control of an entire classroom of students for the duration of a semester is an entirely […]

As I’m gearing up for the responsibility of teaching (or, more accurately, facilitating the learning of) 250 bright-eyed undergraduate university students, I’ve been consciously collecting wisdom that is applicable in the classroom. Some of these tips have already been useful in my preparation, and some will be useful in how I organize my work during […]

Active learning works. Some would say the results were already clear. Active learning [1], in which students spend class time actively engaging with material, by thinking about it, practicing skills, or discussing it with their peers, should result in better learning than the traditional instruction model of passively sitting in a lecture hall. After all, in […]

To initiate conversations or wait for students to come to you? In the physics classroom, this is a question that many inexperienced (and probably some experienced) instructors wrestle with. In a new paper Ido Roll and myself show that the answer is that you should initiate conversations. By observing Teaching Assistants (TAs) and students in a first-year physics lab, we show […]

What science and outreach minded person wouldn’t want to spend two weeks hanging out in Banff and talking about science communication? Heck, maybe I’d actually get to meet Jay Ingram. That was my motivation for applying to the Banff Science Communications program. It sounded pretty nice, like a mini vacation from my then-reality of wrestling with […]