Category Teaching

A first-day AMA

To begin building my own credibility (and that of my TA) in the classroom this semester, we spent 15 minutes hosting an “Ask Us Anything” (as opposed to AMA==Ask Me Anything; inspired by Making the Most of Your First Day of Class). To avoid spending too much time having students write their questions on cards, […]

Why two-stage exams? UBC-centric evidence

At the 2016 CTLT Summer Institute, I co-facilitated the session on Assessment and Evaluation. Using the opportunity to advertise two-stage exams, I provided evidence for three main points: Students learn from them Students participate meaningfully Students like them The research I used to back these is all home-grown at UBC (of course, this isn’t an exhaustive […]

TFW that awesome workshop you did last month had no lasting effect

It happens. You go to a fantastic and intense workshop. The facilitators are enthusiastic. The participants are enthusiastic. It’s invigorating. You feel energized, excited, motivated. You get back to your office and draft up your concrete list of takeaways and to-dos. You start putting things into action, and are pretty excited about the preliminary results. But, […]

Evidence-based teaching strategies in Physics 101

Physics 101 is the introductory calculus-based physics course for life science students at UBC. Over the past decade, departmental efforts related to the Carl Wieman Science Education Initiative have resulted into the “transformation” of this course, from traditional lecture-based instruction to an interactive engagement style. Pre-reading assignments, peer instruction and clickers, in-class worksheets, and two-stage […]

Paired teaching for faculty professional development in teaching

(In this post, I collect presentation materials related to my project studying paired teaching.) In my department, we’ve been pairing faculty together to teach courses. The main goal is to provide these faculty opportunity to develop their teaching. My job is to figure out: Are they learning about teaching? The short answer is: Yes, they are. […]

Participate in your own Learning Catalytics polls

Last term, instead of the UBC-standard iClickers, we used Learning Catalytics as our personal response system in the classroom. Joss Ives has detailed his workflow with the system, which involved three different devices (one to run the lecture slides, one to project the student view of Catalytics, and one to run the instructor side of […]

Developing my spielraum

This semester is my first as an instructor. Although I have a lot of experience as a Teaching Assistant in university physics classrooms, and even some (brief and low-responsibility) experience lecturing in front of a large class, being in full control of an entire classroom of students for the duration of a semester is an entirely […]