Category Teaching

TAPD mini-modules week 4: But, are students really learning?

This semester, we’ve carved out time from the Teaching Assistants’ normal duties—a half-hour per week—to use for professional development activities. This post series tracks our weekly goals and activities. “We’re going to derive this, but I need your help with it.” This was my lead-in to the set of clicker questions we used to derive […]

TAPD mini-modules week 3: “Does F=ma in real life or only in physics?”

This semester, we’ve carved out time from the Teaching Assistants’ normal duties—a half-hour per week—to use for professional development activities. This post series tracks our weekly goals and activities. “Does F=ma in real life or only in physics?” Students say the darnedest things. Over my years as a TA and instructor, I’ve had many interactions […]

TA-PD mini-modules week 2: May I have your attention, please?

This semester, we’ve carved out time from the Teaching Assistants’ normal duties—a half-hour per week—to use for professional development activities. This post series tracks our weekly goals and activities. Over my years as a TA and instructor, I’ve developed strategies to gain and keep the attention of the students when needed. One of my key […]

TA-PD mini-modules week 1: Nailing the intro

This semester, we’ve carved out time from the Teaching Assistants’ normal duties—a half-hour per week—to use for professional development activities. This post series tracks our weekly goals and activities. My first Teaching Assistant experience came as an undergraduate student in an introductory calculus class. My job was to run quizzes and work example problems in […]

A first-day AMA

To begin building my own credibility (and that of my TA) in the classroom this semester, we spent 15 minutes hosting an “Ask Us Anything” (as opposed to AMA==Ask Me Anything; inspired by Making the Most of Your First Day of Class). To avoid spending too much time having students write their questions on cards, […]

Why two-stage exams? UBC-centric evidence

At the 2016 CTLT Summer Institute, I co-facilitated the session on Assessment and Evaluation. Using the opportunity to advertise two-stage exams, I provided evidence for three main points: Students learn from them Students participate meaningfully Students like them The research I used to back these is all home-grown at UBC (of course, this isn’t an exhaustive […]

TFW that awesome workshop you did last month had no lasting effect

It happens. You go to a fantastic and intense workshop. The facilitators are enthusiastic. The participants are enthusiastic. It’s invigorating. You feel energized, excited, motivated. You get back to your office and draft up your concrete list of takeaways and to-dos. You start putting things into action, and are pretty excited about the preliminary results. But, […]