Paired teaching for faculty professional development in teaching

(In this post, I collect presentation materials related to my project studying paired teaching.)

Paired-teaching

Paired teaching: Two faculty are collaboratively responsible for all aspects of teaching a course. (Look at all the smiling students.)

In my department, we’ve been pairing faculty together to teach courses. The main goal is to provide these faculty opportunity to develop their teaching. My job is to figure out: Are they learning about teaching?

The short answer is: Yes, they are.

Of course there’s a longer answer: It depends on things.

See below for more details.


Abstract:  Paired (or co-)teaching is an arrangement in which two faculty are collaboratively responsible for all aspects of teaching a course. By pairing an instructor experienced in research-based instructional strategies (RBIS) with an instructor with little or no experience in RBIS, paired teaching can be used to promote the adoption of RBIS. Using data from post-course interviews with the novice instructors of four such arrangements, we seek to understand the factors that make for effective professional development in teaching via paired teaching. Learning about teaching for the novice instructors was found to be mediated both by the approach of the novice instructor to the paired teaching and the previous teaching experience of the novice instructor. Additionally, the structure of the pair-taught course and the sequence of teaching assignments for the novice instructor both play roles in lowering the barrier to novice instructors adopting RBIS.

Poster presented at the Western Conference on Science Education, the American Association of Physics Teachers Summer Meeting 2015, and the Physics Education Research Conference 2015. Paper submitted to Physics Education Research Conference 2015 ProceedingsTalk given at the American Association of Physics Teachers Summer Meeting 2015.

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